Energy efficiency Wall insulation

Jun 6, 2012 by

A third of all the heat lost in an un-insulated home is lost not through the windows, the roof or the floors but simply through the walls. Cavity wall insulation is a fantastic and effective way to significantly reduce the amount of energy you need to heat your home, resulting in around a £110 savings per year.

If your home was built from 1920 onwards, then chances are that its external walls are `cavity walls’ (this means that they are made of two layers with a small gap or `cavity’ between them.) Insulating your cavity walls is simply the process of filling that gap- with very good reason. Cavity walls are terrible for letting heat escape from the home. Insulation is an effective way to save energy and money at home, as well as providing a warmer, more ‘homely’ household.

As well as cutting costs, insulated walls also means using less energy, which reduces carbon dioxide emissions- one of the biggest causes of climate change. Another reason that cavity wall insulation should be considered is the idea that it can also help to reduce condensation inside the house. Condensation is often a big problem. Cavity wall insulation is so cost effective that it will pay for itself over and over again. The better insulated your home, the less energy you need to keep it warm resulting in lower heating bills.

If your home was built in the last 10 years it is likely that the cavity is already insulated. Some walls can also be unsuitable for cavity wall insulation. It is important to remember that if you’re thinking about cavity wall insulation, always check with a registered installer. He/she will then asses your home and see if it is suitable for insulation.

read more

Related Posts

Tags

Share This

Thermosiphoning

Apr 10, 2012 by

Water underfloor heating systems may involve thermosiphoning. Thermosiphoning is simply a method of heat transfer based on natural convection, meaning that the water of a water underfloor heating system circulates without a mechanical pump. Ideally, this system will simplify the process of pumping liquid and providing heat, and could save some money over other water underfloor heating systems as well.

There are, however, some tips and conditions to keep in mind when considering a thermosiphoning system.

This type of water underfloor heating should only be used in places where freezing temperatures are rare. With the system being based on the natural movement of the water, if it were to freeze, it could compromise the entire system. In this same vein, it is important in thermosiphoning to ensure that all of the pipes are properly insulated.

Air is also a factor in thermosiphoning systems. It is important to avoid air becoming trapped. Therefore, make sure the cold pipe from the bottom of the tank slopes down to the bottom of the heat source. Additionally, make sure the hot pipe slopes up from the top of the heat source. This allows heat and air bubbles to rise up in the tank to where they should go. Also, an air release valve and expansion tank should be located at the highest point in the thermosiphoning system.

Some people like to add a backup heat source for the collectors. This is fine, but the backup’s sensors should be located near the top of the tank. If such sensors or timers are attached to the backup, they should be set up in such a way that the backup will not kick in until the sun has had sufficient time to heat the water.

read more

Related Posts

Tags

Share This

Underfloor Heating: An Environmental Choice

Mar 16, 2012 by

Underfloor heating has many advantages when it comes to warming a home. What some may not realize is that it also has benefits for the environment at the same time.

Underfloor heating systems can be either wet or electric. Wet underfloor heating uses water to heat a home while underfloor electric heating using electricity. Where wet underfloor heating uses a system of pipes carrying hot water, underfloor electric heating uses electric mats to transfer heat.

Both of these systems have advantages over traditional heating methods in terms of environmental friendliness. For one thing, some studies have shown that underfloor heating needs less power in order to operate. This reduces the usage of fossil fuels, thereby preserving those natural resources.

These kinds of systems also produce less waste. By using less fuel, they produce fewer by-products. Traditional heating methods require more energy and therefore create more greenhouse gasses and other waste by-products that are harmful to air quality and the overall health of the environment.

Thoughts and attitudes toward the environment are changing more and more. People are becoming more conscious about their impact and the impact of the companies who supply them with things like electricity and heat. Many are looking for alternatives to traditional methods.

Here, again, underfloor heating may have an edge over traditional heating methods when it comes to the environment. Some underfloor heating companies are switching to alternative power sources, including clean energy like solar power. While this change is by no means industry-wide, it is one that is starting to come into play in underfloor heating systems.

Picture courtesy of eutrophication&hypoxia’s

read more

Related Posts

Tags

Share This

‘Washing’ denim in your freezer??

Dec 26, 2011 by

When I read that Levi Strauss & Company are now asking customers to freeze their jeans I thought it was for menopausal women, not to actually clean them to as the company believes save more water. A quick search of the internet reveals a lot of people who have tried this (and not being locked away by their other halves for insanity reason) haven’t really found it to be that effective at actually cleaning their jeans.

After all it won’t get stains out of it or muck and dirt but apparently does kill germs and removes smell. However some scientists dispute the claim that freezing jeans kill germs. Some people have frozen their fancy jeans, such as ones which have expensive effects and detailing which would be lost/ruined if washed in a washing machine and they report varying results.

Either way I think I will be laying off freezing my jeans for now, at the moment if I feel they need freshening up a bit then all I need to do is hang them outside for a couple of hours. Plus I don’t really like the thought of having jeans in my freezer nor do I think I have room.

Anyway the main reason for Levis stance on jean washing is because of concern that future water shortage threatens the company’s existence itself, by depleting the world’s cotton supply. So they will be sowing this message into all their clothing!

Apparently according to a New York Times report, on the advisory, it’s claimed that a typical pair of jeans takes about ‘919 gallons of water’ to clean during its life cycle.

read more

Related Posts

Tags

Share This

Tips on home energy efficiency

Nov 7, 2011 by

Following on from my previous post on switching energy suppliers I thought it would be worth while giving you guys some tips on energy efficiency. I have recently made some changes to my home to make it more energy efficient in the hope I can save some money on my heating bills.

Last weekend I embarked on tank and pipe insulation, to reduce the amount of heat lost from my tank and pipes and keep my water hotter for longer. This was certainly a DIY job I was easily able to undertake even though I am somewhat of a DIY novice.

I visited my local DIY store to purchase a British Standard ‘jacket’ to go around my tank, for best insulation you ‘jacket’ need to be at least 75mm thick so even if your tank has one make sure its thick enough. By doing this you can cut heat loss by over 75%. My jacket was fairly inexpensive at £15, considering the money I could save with it and the insulation for my pipes was also cheap costing about £10.

Luckily for me most of the pipes were easily accessible however if you find yours aren’t don’t worry you can get professional help to insulate your pipes. I still have to look at my loft insulation situation and decide if I need more, plus I will also be looking into wall insulation. Because I live in an older house I have a feeling that I will have cavity walls which means I should be able to have them filled to help insulate my home.

Insulating your walls can be more expensive and not all homes can have them or need them so getting a professional opinion like I will be is your best option.

read more

Related Posts

Tags

Share This